Past Research

RecA protein assures fidelity of DNA repair and genome stability in Deinococcus radiodurans.

RecA protein assures fidelity of DNA repair and genome stability in Deinococcus radiodurans.
Deinococcus radiodurans is one of the most radiation-resistant organisms known. It can repair hundreds of radiation-induced double-strand DNA breaks without loss of viability. Genome reassembly in heavily irradiated D. radiodurans is considered to be an error-free process since no genome rearrangements were detected after post-irradiation repair. Here, we describe for the first time conditions that frequently cause erroneous chromosomal assemblies.

Protein damage and death by radiation in Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans.

Protein damage and death by radiation in Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans.
Deinococcus radiodurans is among a small number of bacterial species that are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation, UV light, toxic chemicals, and desiccation. We measured proteome oxidation (i.e., protein carbonylation, PC) in D. radiodurans as well as in standard and evolved resistant strains of Escherichia coli exposed to ionizing radiation or UVC light and found a consistent correlation with cell killing. The unique quantitative relationship between incurred PC and cell death holds over the entire range of killing for all tested bacteria and for both lethal agents, meaning that both bacterial species are equally sensitive to PC.

Unstructured hydrophilic sequences in prokaryotic proteomes correlate with dehydration tolerance and host association.

Unstructured hydrophilic sequences in prokaryotic proteomes correlate with dehydration tolerance and host association.
Here, we explore possible hallmarks of prokaryotic desiccation tolerance in their proteomes. The content of unstructured, low complexity (LC) regions was analyzed in a total of 460 bacterial and archaeal proteomes. It appears that species endowed with proteomes abundant in unstructured hydrophilic LC regions are desiccation-tolerant or sporulating bacteria, halophilic archaea and bacteria, or host-associated species.

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Greatest quotes

Life is not easy for any of us, but what of that? We must have perseverance and above all confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted in something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be attained.

- Marie Curie -

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in the BOOK: SOS Hypothesis and the Emergence of Integrative Biology

 
2007, 307-313, DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4020-6466-1_16

   click the cover if you need this book  

 

 

 

 chapter: SOS Hypothesis and the Emergence of Integrative Biology

Abstract 

A major discovery can often be recognized by the need to coin a new word (e.g., atom, radioactivity, antibiotic, apoptosis, etc). If the discovered entity or phenomenon does not have its cognate word in our vocabulary, it is surely a breakthrough. Coining the word SOS response (SOS system, SOS replication, SOS repair) to describe coordinated multiple inducible cellular responses to DNA damage resulting in induced mutagenesis and cell survival, was such a privilege (Radman 1974). This is a personal historical account of the intellectual circumstances that led to the birth of SOS hypothesis. I shall suggest that the synthetic thinking about diverse and disconnected experimental observations that eventually led to the concept of cellular SOS response could, in retrospect, be considered as the emergence of integrative biology. It was not an easy birth, for, back in 1970/71, I could not be understood by the “best and brightest” molecular biologists residing in the Biological Laboratories of the Harvard University where I was a postdoctoral fellow with Matthew Meselson. I lived with the certainty that my failure was due only to my lack of talent and know how in clear presentation. But, now I think that it was also due to a clash of scientific cultures: the almighty rigorous, unidirectional, analytical thinking versus a fragile, creative, “lateral”, synthetic thinking. My memo on the “SOS hypothesis” sent out by the end of 1970 to a dozen of top experts in DNA repair and mutagenesis inspired no answer. Fortunately, I started to work on Meselson’s project of mismatch repair in genetic recombination.
 

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Miroslav Radman - Molecular Biology and Genetics Scientist